The Boy’s King Arthur, Part II

Back cover of Boy's King Arthur

Another illustration from The Boy’s King Arthur, being Sir Thomas Malory’s History of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table (1922).

Edited by Sidney Lanier and illustrated by N. C. Wyeth.

This one comes from the back cover (I think).

A reminder that you can view this painting in the canvas at Brandywine River Museum’s N.C. Wyeth Catalogue Raisonné here.

You may not go, but at least you can think about it.

The Boy’s King Arthur, Part I

Front page

The Boy’s King Arthur, being Sir Thomas Malory’s History of King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table (1922).

Edited by Sidney Lanier and illustrated by N. C. Wyeth.

I remember seeing this book when I was younger; I can’t remember if I read it.

But the illustrations stuck out to me – so much so that I recognized them right away when I found them clicking through the internet the other day.

The picture above is from the title page, you can see much more of Mr. Wyeth’s work here.

Or see them for yourself at the Brandywine River Museum’s N.C. Wyeth Catalogue Raisonné here – which is amazing to me. I saw these paintings as a kid, but I could visit the originals now? Pretty fantastic!

Café Zimmermann

Zimmermannsches_Caffeehaus

Above is an engraving by Johann Georg Schreiber (circa 1732) of the “Zimmermannsche Kaffeehaus” or “Café Zimmermann”, a coffeehouse based in Leipzig, Germany.

Please check out the Wikipedia articles for more goodness (with references), but I thought this stuff was wild:

  • Johann Sebastian Bach wrote a cantata entitled Schweigt stille, plaudert nicht (Be still, stop chattering), BWV 211
  • This secular cantata came to be known as the Coffee Cantata, as the story involves a father trying to get his daughter to stop drinking the stuff by offering to find her a husband
  • Café Zimmermann formed the backdrop to the first performances of many of Bach’s secular cantatas, including the Coffee Cantata
  • The former coffeehouse was destroyed during can air raid on Leipzig in 1943
  • Café Zimmermann is a French classical music ensemble that takes its name from said coffeehouse

Coffee is good. Music is good. History is good.

Grab a good cup o’ Joe and think on these things.